Deceptive advertising and deontology

February 25, Advertising ethics has changed drastically over the years.

Deceptive advertising and deontology

Consequentialism Because deontological theories are best understood in contrast to consequentialist ones, a brief look at consequentialism and a survey of the problems with it that motivate its deontological opponents, provides a helpful prelude to taking up deontological theories themselves.

Some consequentialists are monists about the Good. Other consequentialists are pluralists regarding the Good. Moreover, there are some consequentialists who hold that the doing or refraining from doing, of certain kinds of acts are themselves intrinsically valuable states of affairs constitutive of the Good.

None of these pluralist positions erase the difference between consequentialism and deontology. For the essence of consequentialism is still present in such positions: However much consequentialists differ about what the Good consists in, they all agree that the morally right choices are those that increase either directly or indirectly the Good.

Consequentialism is frequently criticized on a number of grounds. Two of these are particularly apt for revealing the temptations motivating the alternative approach to deontic ethics that is deontology.

The two criticisms pertinent here are that consequentialism is, on the one hand, overly demanding, and, on the other hand, that it is not demanding enough. The criticism regarding extreme demandingness runs like this: All acts are seemingly either required or forbidden.

On the other hand, consequentialism is also criticized for what it seemingly permits. It seemingly demands and thus, of course, permits that in certain circumstances innocents be killed, beaten, lied to, or deprived of material goods to produce greater benefits for others.

Consequences—and only consequences—can conceivably justify any kind of act, for it does not matter how harmful it is to some so long as it is more beneficial to others.

A well-worn example of this over-permissiveness of consequentialism is that of a case standardly called, Transplant. A surgeon has five patients dying of organ failure and one healthy patient whose organs can save the five.

In the right circumstances, surgeon will be permitted and indeed required by consequentialism to kill the healthy patient to obtain his organs, assuming there are no relevant consequences other than the saving of the five and the death of the one. Likewise, consequentialism will permit in a case that we shall call, Fat Man that a fat man be pushed in front of a runaway trolley if his being crushed by the trolley will halt its advance towards five workers trapped on the track.

Autonomy: Normative | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy

We shall return to these examples later on. Consequentialists are of course not bereft of replies to these two criticisms.

Deceptive advertising and deontology

This move opens up some space for personal projects and relationships, as well as a realm of the morally permissible. It is not clear, however, that satisficing is adequately motivated, except to avoid the problems of maximizing.

Nor is it clear that the level of mandatory satisficing can be nonarbitrarily specified, or that satisficing will not require deontological constraints to protect satisficers from maximizers. On this view, our negative duty is not to make the world worse by actions having bad consequences; lacking is a corresponding positive duty to make the world better by actions having good consequences Bentham ; Quinton We thus have a consequentialist duty not to kill the one in Transplant or in Fat Man; and there is no counterbalancing duty to save five that overrides this.

Feb 25,  · Ethical Theories and Advertising February 25, Advertising ethics has changed drastically over the years. What was acceptable advertising in the s would probably not be acceptable in today’s society. The first that comes to mind is Deontology. Deontology is most associated with German philosopher Immanuel Kant. Oct 22,  · Deontological Essay; Deontological Essay. Kant Deontological Theory. Words | 7 Pages Deontology and Accounting Ethics Amanda Dunn Liberty University Introduction Body 1 Ethical Systems Description 1 Deontological 2 Utilitarian 2 Ethical Systems Evaluation 1 Organizational Culture of Accounting 2 AICPA . The term ‘false advertising’, which is also referred to as deceptive advertising, is an illegal action taken by a marketer, manufacturer, or seller of a particular good or service to inaccurately advertise their underlying product.

Yet as with the satisficing move, it is unclear how a consistent consequentialist can motivate this restriction on all-out optimization of the Good.

Yet another idea popular with consequentialists is to move from consequentialism as a theory that directly assesses acts to consequentialism as a theory that directly assesses rules—or character-trait inculcation—and assesses acts only indirectly by reference to such rules or character-traits Alexander Its proponents contend that indirect consequentialism can avoid the criticisms of direct act consequentialism because it will not legitimate egregious violations of ordinary moral standards—e.

The relevance here of these defensive maneuvers by consequentialists is their common attempt to mimic the intuitively plausible aspects of a non-consequentialist, deontological approach to ethics.

For as we shall now explore, the strengths of deontological approaches lie: In contrast to consequentialist theories, deontological theories judge the morality of choices by criteria different from the states of affairs those choices bring about.The term ‘false advertising’, which is also referred to as deceptive advertising, is an illegal action taken by a marketer, manufacturer, or seller of a particular good or service to inaccurately advertise their underlying product.

Essays - largest database of quality sample essays and research papers on Deceptive Advertising And Deontology. May 23,  · LINK is the official publication of the Mary Help of Christians College Seminary.

The term ‘false advertising’, which is also referred to as deceptive advertising, is an illegal action taken by a marketer, manufacturer, or seller of a particular good or service to inaccurately advertise their underlying product. Oct 22,  · Deontological Essay; Deontological Essay. Kant Deontological Theory. Words | 7 Pages Deontology and Accounting Ethics Amanda Dunn Liberty University Introduction Body 1 Ethical Systems Description 1 Deontological 2 Utilitarian 2 Ethical Systems Evaluation 1 Organizational Culture of Accounting 2 AICPA . ETHICAL ISSUES AND PRINCIPLES RELATED TO ADVERTISING Manender Singh Research Scholar, Department of Commerce, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra, India Advertising to children, deceptive advertising, and other issues which can lead to moral deterioration of the society.

This opus is intended to inform and to share with others about seminary life. It also provides a forum for seminarians to express their philosophical insights about the human person and life.

IV- DECEPTIVE ADVERTISING: DEFENDED (Arguments . Jerry Kirkpatrick, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona Principles of Advertising, or Marketing Management.

Deontological Ethics (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)

marketing harmful products, planned obsolescence, deceptive pricing, deceptive advertising, the monopoly power of advertising, price discrimination, and invasion of pri-.

The arguments given in support of this claim largely follow those mentioned above in relation to truthfulness–viz. that respect for others’ autonomy is incompatible with deception or manipulation–combined with the claim that persuasive advertising practices constitute deception or .

Feb 25,  · Ethical Theories and Advertising February 25, Advertising ethics has changed drastically over the years. What was acceptable advertising in the s would probably not be acceptable in today’s society. The first that comes to mind is Deontology.

Deontology is most associated with German philosopher Immanuel Kant.

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